9 Things Producers Should Know: A New Conservation Option for Va’s Ag Producers

Michael-2013Resource management plans are a new way for agricultural producers and landowners to preserve soil and water quality while improving their bottom line.  Plus, there’s this bonus: Farms operating under an RMP plan are deemed to be in compliance with state nutrient and sediment standards for nine years. The program was launched in 2014 and has been endorsed by both agricultural and environmental leaders. Participation in an RMP plan is completely voluntary, and there’s funding available to help landowners initiate the program.

The program encourages farmers to have a private-sector developer create an RMP plan for their farm or a portion of it. The plan will take into account the property’s existing stream buffer, soil conservation, nutrient management and stream-exclusion practices. The developer will inform the landowner of any additional practices that need to be implemented to qualify for the RMP certificate.

Once the plan is approved and implemented, the property owner is granted certainty from state nutrient and sediment water quality standards for the next nine years.

While the program is new, it’s based on conservation practices that have been used successfully for years. The mix of practices not only helps prevent water pollution, but they keep farms efficient and profitable. Nutrient management plans and soil conservation practices can help maintain nutrients and reduce soil loss. Stream exclusion often leads to healthy herds, fewer veterinary costs and more marketable livestock.

Another positive for the agricultural community is that the program enables better tracking of practices that are in place. This ensures that farmers receive the credit they deserve for helping to protect soil and water resources across Virginia.

Funding is available through the Virginia Agricultural Cost Share program to fund both development of RMPs and the practices needed to complete one.

For more information, including contact information for certified resource management plan developers, visit www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil_and_water/rmp.shtml. Or, contact your local soil and water conservation district.  For those living in Franklin, Henry, Roanoke Counties and the City of Roanoke, contact Michael Tabor (Conservation Technician) at the Blue Ridge Soil & Water Conservation District by calling (540) 483-5341 ext. 122. For Henry County residents call us at (276) 632-3164 ext. 3.  Click here to discover the 9 things producers should know: RMP_9Things-brochure

 

 

 

 

 

 

Envirothon – What’s It All About?

Jessica Kaknevicius (Ontario Envirothon) will be hosting an “ENVIROTHON WEBINAR” through Green Teacher http://greenteacher.com/webinars/  on THURSDAY, January 22nd at 7:30-8:30 EST.  It will be generic, and not focused on Ontario, Jessica will be using the Ontario Envirothon pEnvirothon picturerogram as an example. Details at:  http://greenteacher.com/webinars/ You will have to set-up an account with Green Teacher if you do not already have on. I would encourage you to pass the word and to join in on this webinar, or any of the others that the “Green Teacher” may offer.

If you have questions, please contact Jessica directly Jessica Kaknevicius Education Programs Manager FORESTS ONTARIO 144 Front Street West, Suite 700 Toronto, ON, M5J 2L7 P:  416-4934565 x. 226 E:  jkaknevicius@forestsontario.ca

About Us:

The Envirothon is a program of the National Conservation Foundation (NCF), a 501(c)3 not-for profit organization.  The Envirothon is established to provide a naturl resource encounter and environmental education program for high school students throughout North America.  Contact Envirothon at www.envirothon.org.

Maintaining Your Septic System

Septic System Diagram 3What is a septic system and what does it do?

A septic system is a wastewater treatment system connected to your home that consists of a septic tank, a distribution box and a drain field.  All are underground.  Septic systems are used widely in areas not served by public sewer.  The purpose of a septic system is to carry wastes and wastewater away from your home and to treat it so that it is safe when it reaches the ground water supply, which is used for drinking water supplies and recreation.  Each part of the system plays an important role and must be properly maintained to function properly.

*     Do you know where your septic system is located?

*     Can you recall the last time our septic system was pumped?

*     How can you tell if your septic system has failed?

*     Does it help to add yeast to your septic system?

*     How do household cleaners affect your septic system?

*     How often should you have your septic system inspected?

*      How familiar are you with the septic system “DO’s and DON’Ts”?

For answers to these questions and more contact your local health department and visit- http://www.nesc.wvu.edu/pdf/ww/septic/pl_fall04.pdf