2022 NACD/VASWCD POSTER CONTEST and SCOUT PATCH PROGRAM

Blue Ridge SWCD Poster Contest Rules

The Blue Ridge SWCD’s Poster Contest is open to students (K-12) attending public, home school or private school in Franklin, Henry, Roanoke Counties and the City of Roanoke.
  • The Conservation Poster Contest is open to kindergarten through twelfth grade students and entered into one of the grade divisions (K-1; 2-3; 4-6; 7-9; 10-12).
  • Poster size must be within 8.5”x11” (letter-size) to 22”x28” (full-size poster board)
  • Posters must be hand-drawn.  Any media may be used to create a flat poster including: paint, crayon, colored pencil, charcoal, stickers, paper, and/or other materials. 
  • All posters must be created by an individual student, rather than a team of students.  Entries must be a contestant’s original creation and may not be traced from photographs or other artist’s published works.
  • The 2022 Stewardship theme “Healthy Soil Healthy Life” must be included on the front side of each poster submission to be eligible for the national poster contest.
  • Each entry must be submitted with a completed entry form attached to the back of the poster.  This entry form must be signed by a parent or guardian to be eligible for the contest. 
  • Posters are due to the Blue Ridge SWCD office by Friday, September 16, 2022 by the close of business.  Posters may be mailed or dropped off at the district office. 
  • Although younger students will most likely receive help in planning from parents and/or teachers, Blue Ridge SWCD encourages each student to do their own work.  Note: Entries with student handwriting and coloring will score higher than those designed, drawn and colored by adult assistance. 
  • Posters entered into the national competition must have been judged by the Blue Ridge SWCD sponsored poster contest and the VASWCD sponsored poster contest.
  • The 1st place poster in each category will be submitted to the VASWCD. The winners of the state contest will receive a prize and move on to the NACD Poster Contest. The top three posters (in each category) of the national contest will receive monetary prizes. First place winners will receive $200, second place winners will receive $150 and 3rd place winners will receive $100.  Monetary prizes at the national level are sponsored by the NACD Auxiliary from their quilt project and the Albert I Pierce Foundation.
  • Any Scout who creates a poster and submits to Blue Ridge SWCD to earn the VASWCD Poster Contest Patch must request a patch on the completed entry form submitted with his or her poster.
  • All posters will be returned to participants after the contest(s) are completed.

Poster Evaluations

Poster Contest Entries are reviewed by the Blue Ridge SWCD Scholarship/Youth Committee based on the following criteria:

  • Conservation message (50 percent) (Poster uses correct theme)
  • Visual effectiveness (30 percent)
  • Originality (10 percent) and
  • Universal appeal (10 percent)
SCOUT PATCH LEADERS GUIDE
March 17, 2022Permalink

Blue Ridge SWCD Monthly Meeting

The Blue Ridge Soil and Water Conservation District Board is scheduled to meet briefly on Monday, August 22, 2022 at 12:45 p.m. at the Horse Pasture Volunteer Fire Department, 18287 A. L. Philpott Hwy, Ridgeway, VA. Social distancing is recommended.

October 18, 2021Permalink

Youth Conservation Leadership Institute:

What is it and how does it work?

FrogletsInWater

What is Youth Conservation Leadership Institute and how does it work?

Youth Conservation Leadership Institute (YCLI) is a recognition program for students in 9th- 12th grade that focuses on volunteer service and environmental stewardship.  YCLI began as an expansion of Youth Conservation Camp in an effort to keep students engaged in the environmental topics introduced at camp. YCLI offers high school students interested in environmental conservation and stewardship an opportunity to build leadership skills and connect with local mentors involved with environmental issues. 

Students in 9th-12th grade may apply.  Program participants are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of community service with a conservation focus. The hours may be done as part of a single project or a series of projects but all projects must be approved by the YCLI Program Coordinator.   YCLI participants work with the YCLI Program Coordinator to come up with a project that the YCLI Participant wants to focus on.  The YCLI Participants are paired with a mentor to help them with their project.  Mentors can be Soil & Water Conservation Staff, Natural Resource Professional,  4-H Agent, etc.   

There will be a zoom meeting at the beginning of the program to allow all participants a chance to meet and brainstorm for their projects.

The program will conclude with an awards and recognition ceremony to be held in Spring of 2022.  The recognition program agenda will include time for participants to speak about their work and hear from key speakers in the conservation field.

YCLI is a unique opportunity for 9th-12th graders  to receive experience and engage in networking opportunities to prepare them for future education and career paths.

Who is Eligible to Apply?

 Students in 9th-12th grade  with a strong interest in natural resources conservation and related fields are encouraged to apply.  YCLI is open to homeschool, private and public school students.   Click here for the the 2021-2022 YCLI application. Deadline to apply is Friday Oct. 1st, 2021.      Please contact Bonnie.mahl@vaswcd.org if you or your student has interest and would like to discuss. 

Past YCLI Projects Include: 

  • Building birdhouses for Warblers
  • Teaching elementary students about watersheds
  • Developing and Installing Trail Signage
  • Litter Clean Ups
  • Clothing Drive 
  • Education Outreach about being an Intern with the Elizabeth River Project 
  • Conservation Education Outreach to Elementary Students
  • Stormwater Education Outreach 
  • Pollinator Gardens
  • Soil Compaction Education & Outreach to Homeowners 

What past participants have said about YCLI:

  • “My favorite part was teaching others and sharing my message.”- 2019-2020 YCLI Participant
  • “Being able to help my community while having support.”-2019-2020 YCLI Participant
  • “My favorite part was feeling like I was helping my community.”- 2019-2020 YCLI Participant
  • “Being able to present about my project to my peers from across the state and compare similarities and differences.”-2017-2018 YCLI Participant
  • “I liked being able to come up with my own project about something that was important to me, as well as the sense of accomplishment at the end.”-2017-2018 YCLI Participant 
  • “My favorite part of the program was implementing the project I helped plan and organize. I loved being able to see my ideas become a reality and I loved seeing how my project beneficially impacted students and adults in my community.”- 2016-2017 YCLI Participant
  • “Getting to make a change in the community for the better.”-2017-2018 YCLI Participant
  • “This is one of the only programs in our area that allows students a one-on-one experience with people working in conservation.”-  2016-2017 YCLI Participant
  • “My favorite part of the program was meeting a mentor from the SWCD. This gave me insight into the filed of conservation and a way to stay involved. ” – 2016-2017 YCLI Participant

Tumbler-style Compost Workshop

How does your garden grow? Learn how to develop compost that can be used as a soil amendment or as an amendment to grow plants by constructing your own tumbler-style composter. Please bring your own power drill, drill bits (1/4″, 1/2″ and a small drill bit to pre-drill holes for the wood screws) and a Phillips head drill bit for wood screws. Please have the proper transportation to take your completed composter(s) home as one measures 3.5′ deep x 31″ wide x 4.6′ high. It is recommended to bring a friend to assist you with your construction.

The Blue Ridge Soil & Water Conservation District will be conducting Tumbler-style Compost Workshop on the following dates at the Essig Center on Technology Drive, Rocky Mount, VA from 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm:

Thursday, July 28, 2022

Thursday, August 18, 2022

For additional information, register on line (one week prior to the scheduled class) at https://www.playfranklincounty.com

Cost: $100/Tumbler- Style Composter

SIGN-UP for FY 2022 State BMP Cost Share

Rotational Grazing and Stream Exclusion

When:     Thursday, July 1 – Friday, September 3, 2021

APPOINTMENT ONLY to schedule an appointment contact:

  Michael Tabor,  Sr. Conservation Specialist, (540) 352-3323 or       

Allen Jackson, Conservation Technician, (540) 352-3329

NEW Planting Dates: Cover Crop planting dates extended by two weeks – Details provided during signup appointment.

 NEW Participant Cap: Raised to $150,000 per participant for FY22.

SIGN-UP PERIOD: Sign-up for BMP Cost Share or VA Tax Credits

 SIGN-UP PERIOD: Sign-up for BMP Cost Share or VA Tax Credits prior to September 3rd for the first round of ranking. Many programs offered.

REMINDER: Current Nutrient Management Plan is required for all cover crop participants in the VACS (Virginia Cost Share) programs or to receive specified VA State Tax Credits. Sign-up for cost share by September 3rd.

VA State Tax Credits: VA State Tax Credits available. Details provided

during signup appointment. Increased credits for FY22.

The Blue Ridge Soil & Water Conservation District sets priorities and objectives that are defined in a strategic plan.  An annual plan of work is completed by forming committees such as Budget, Soil Stewardship, Youth, Annual Report, Conservation Awards, Annual Tour, Newsletter, Scholarship, Personnel, and other committees as needed. The Board of Directors encourages land users to adopt Best Management Practices such as conservation tillage in their farm plans.   This District works from a budget to effectively manage funds, facilities and equipment.  The Blue Ridge SWCD supports the Virginia Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts, the Virginia Soil and Water Conservation Board, and the National Association of Conservation Districts.  The directors attend area, state, and national meetings. The Commonwealth of Virginia supports the Blue Ridge Soil and Water Conservation District through financial and administrative assistance provided by the Department of Conservation and Recreation. Funding for the programs outlined in this report comes from a variety of sources, namely: DCR, local county governments, corporate sponsorship and donations.  Other funding comes from a variety of sources, mainly federal and state grants. All programs and services of the Blue Ridge Soil and Water Conservation District are offered on a nondiscriminatory basis, without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, sexual orientation, marital status, or handicap.

Rain Barrel Workshop Schedule

If you would like to harvest rain water for your garden and landscaping needs then this is an opportunity for you to construct our very own rain barrel. This old idea is making a big splash! Please have the proper transportation to take the barrel(s) home as they are approximately 53 gallons measuring 42″ in height and 24″ in diameter.

The Blue Ridge Soil & Water Conservation District will be conducting Rain Barrel Workshops on the following dates at the Essig Center on Technology Drive Rocky Mount, VA from 5:30 pm-7:30 pm:

Thursday, July 7, 2022

Thursday, August 4, 2022

For additional information, register on line (one week prior to the scheduled class) at https://www.playfranklincounty.com

Cost: $60/Rain Barrel

Happy Earth Day-April 22nd

Happy Earth Day 2021

Earth Day is an annual event celebrated around the world on April 22 to demonstrate support for environmental protection . First celebrated in 1970, it now includes events coordinated globally by the Earth Day Network in more than 193 countries. Here are a list of resources you can visit to give you some ideas to share and celebrate Earth Day:

https://www.dcr.virginia.gov

https://www.epa.gov/earthday

http://www.pollinator.org

https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/nativeplants

https://www.usda.gov/topics/forestry

https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water

2022 Events

August 2022
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  • March 24, 2022: Area V Envirothon Training
  • March 28, 2022: Blue Ridge SWCD Monthly Board Meeting (refer to home page for location and time)
  • April, May, June, July & August 2022: Rain Barrel Workshop- Registration through https://www.playfranklincounty.com
  • April, May, June, July & August 2022: Tumbler-style Compost Workshop – Registration through https://www.playfranklincounty.com

VDOF & VCE MAKE LAND LEGACY PLANNING MORE ACCESSIBLE

VDOF & VCE MAKE LAND LEGACY PLANNING MORE ACCESSIBLE

Contact:

Karen Snape, Virginia Cooperative Extension 540-231-6494 ksnape@vt.edu
Andrew Fotinos, Virginia Department of Forestry 434.270.4090 andrew.fotinos@dof.virginia.gov

VDOF & VCE MAKE LAND LEGACY PLANNING MORE ACCESSIBLE

The Virginia Department of Forestry (VDOF) and the Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) encourage landowners to make plans for passing on their land to the next generation – right now. The Generation NEXT program is a collaboration between VDOF and VCE that helps Virginia landowners keep forests intact, in forest, and in family.

Generation NEXT is hosting two low-cost virtual legacy planning series this year – in April and September – to help landowners take the first steps and clarify some of the misconceptions about the legacy planning process that might prevent people from getting started.
Many landowners are overwhelmed by the legacy planning process and assume that it primarily involves complicated work with attorneys and accountants. This assumption might cause landowners to delay thinking about what they want to happen to their land when they’re no longer around to manage it. The Generation NEXT program demonstrates how estate planning (working with lawyers and accountants) is just one part of the legacy planning process.

“One of the most important steps in legacy planning includes conversations between you and the people who will steward your land after you’re gone. Do they understand your stewardship goals for the property? Do they feel a connection to the land? Are there key pieces of information you need to share about the property? Having these conversations is critical,” says Adam Downing, Virginia Cooperative Extension Agent.

If a landowner passes away without clearly established plans for their estate (including their land), things can quickly become complicated for the surviving family members. The Generation NEXT program provides families with resources and tools that make the process more manageable and accessible.

With the Generation NEXT workshops, families pay a single fee to participate, even if they are geographically separated. The workshops serve as designated opportunities for family members to ask difficult questions, receive useful information, and get on the same page about plans for the future. Typically, these sessions are in-person, so dispersed families are taking advantage of the virtual offerings.

As a companion to the workshop series, the Generation NEXT team created a publication, Legacy Planning: A Guide for Virginia Landowners that provides an overview of the nine major steps involved in developing a robust land legacy plan. It includes case studies from landowners throughout Virginia and guides landowners to tools and resources. The free publication is available online or in-print (by request). https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/dam/pubs_ext_vt_edu/CNRE/cnre-121/CNRE-121.pdf

Landowners should approach legacy planning as an on-going process. “Much like a forest changes over time, your legacy plans will evolve. As priorities change or family dynamics shift, so should plans for your land,” says Andrew Fotinos, Conservation Specialist with VDOF. “Having the Legacy Planning publication on-hand will help landowners as they periodically revisit the nine steps over time.”
With spring and summer just around the corner, it’s the perfect time to engage with Step Eight: “Provide opportunities for your family to learn about and enjoy your woodlands.” Explore your property with future generations to instill in them the importance of good land stewardship.

Spring dates for the Generation NEXT workshops are April 7, 8, 14 & 15. Those interested in attending the spring workshop should register by March 31 to guarantee their spot and receive a print copy of the Legacy Planning publication before courses begin. Fall workshops will take place on September 8, 9, 15 & 16. Families or individuals can register for either the spring or fall dates, or they may elect to attend both series for a comprehensive experience. Content may overlap in the two series, but they are not identical.

Registration can be completed online: https://ext.vt.edu/natural-resources/legacy-planning/training.html

About the Virginia Department of Forestry

The Virginia Department of Forestry protects and develops healthy, sustainable forest resources for Virginians.  With nearly 16 million acres of forestland and more than 108,000 Virginians employed in forestry, forest products and related industries, Virginia forests provide an overall economic output of more than $21 Billion annually.

Headquartered in Charlottesville, the Agency has forestry staff members assigned to every county to provide citizen service and public safety protection across the Commonwealth, which it’s been doing now for more than 100 years. VDOF is an equal opportunity provider.

About the Virginia Cooperative Extension

Virginia Cooperative Extension brings the resources of Virginia’s land-grant universities, Virginia Tech and Virginia State University, to the people of the commonwealth. We are a dynamic organization that stimulates positive personal and societal change, leading to more productive lives, families, farms, and forests as well as a better environment.

Understanding that knowledge is power, we place that power in the hands of Virginians and help them learn how to use it to improve the quality of their lives. Our Extension agents and specialists form a network of educators whose classrooms are the communities, homes, and businesses of Virginia, where they bring research-based solutions to the problems facing Virginians today. Extension programs are delivered through a network of faculty at two universities, 108 county and city offices, 11 agricultural research and Extension centers, and six 4-H educational centers. 

VCE and VDOF programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.