Workshop: Focusing on Land Transfer to Generation “NEXT”

You value your forest and/or farmland for multiple reasons such as wildlife, privacy, recreation, timber, hunting or the scenic qualities. Are you prepared to pass the environmental and heirloom values rooted in your forest to the next generation? Without breaking it up? Click here to access the Online Registration Form 2017 Radford Generation Next

While there is a price to planning an orderly transfer of land to the next generation, there is also a cost of not planning that may put your land’s future in jeopardy. If you don’t have a plan, your wishes for your land and legacy will be lost. By researching and planning ahead of time, you can ensure your wishes are met and minimize the financial costs and emotional challenges while securing your woodland legacy for generations to come.

Land may be your biggest asset. Make sure your actions support the family’s values. This award winning and nationally recognized program will get you started on the right path. Please join us for a hands-on workshop with free legal guidance from professionals experienced in intergenerational land transfer and landowner testimonials of estate planning steps and strategies they have used.

Speakers include legal and financial experts experienced in estate planning as well as natural resource professionals who work with landowners to conserve land and plan the future.

The program “Focusing on Forestland Transfer to Generation ‘NEXT’” is being offered in Radford this year from 12:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. on August 22 and 29 at the SELU Conservancy. Participants should attend both dates. Dinner will be included along with reading and workshop materials. A registration fee of $70 covers up to two participants from the same family.

To register online, visit http://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu and click the “Online Registration” tab at the top of the page. The deadline to register is August 8.  For more information, contact Jennifer Gagnon at 540-231-6391 or jgagnon@vt.edu.

Persons with disabilities who desire any assistive devices, services or other accommodations to participate in this activity may also contact Jennifer during the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. to discuss accommodations, no later than August 8. *TDD number is (800) 828-1120.

The workshop receives financial support from the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Best Management Practice Applications Now Being Accepted for 2017-2018

             The Blue Ridge Soil & Water Conservation District located at 1297 State Street, Rocky Mount, VA is currently accepting applications for assistance with installation of agricultural best management practices that are designed to conserve soil and protect water quality.

July 1, 2017 began our new fiscal year and agriculture producers who are considering signing up for assistance this year are encouraged to do so as soon as possible.  Since funding is limited, all practices must be signed-up prior to implementation and are subject to prioritized ranking for approval. 2017-2018 Cost-Share applications will be accepted July 17, 2017 through close of business on Friday, August 4, 2017.  If cost-share is still available after this first sign-up round, a second sign-up round of cost-share may be offered at a later date.  The following is a list of some of the practices available for cost share, however, it is not an exhaustive list.

  • Reforestation of Erodible Crop Land & Pasture Land
  • Grazing Land Protection (stream exclusion, water fountains, well, pipeline and fencing)
  • Harvestable Cover Crop
  • Non-Harvestable Cover Crop
  • Continuous No-Till
  • Animal Waste Control Facility
  • Nutrient management Plan Writing
  • Split Application of Nitrogen on Corn using Pre-Sidedress Nitrate Test
  • Late Winter Split Application of Nitrogen on Small Grains
  • Riparian Vegetative or Forested Buffers

 

For more information regarding water quality and erosion control best management practices, please contact Michael Tabor (Conservation Technician) at (540) 483-5341 ext. 122.

2017 Youth Conservation Camp Applications Available – Apply Now!


2017 Youth Conservation Camp-Apply Now!

The Blue Ridge Soil and Water Conservation District is offering scholarship(s) to a limited number of qualified applicant(s) within Franklin, Henry, Roanoke Counties and the City of Roanoke to attend an expense paid, week-long conservation camp at Virginia Tech.  Camp dates are Sunday, July 9 through Saturday, July 15, 2017.  Soil and Water Conservation officials from the local, state and federal levels and Virginia Tech faculty members work together to conduct the camp.

Applicants must be in grades 9 through 12 of the 2016-2017 academic school year.  Twelfth graders who graduate from high school in May, June, July or August 2017 are eligible to attend.  Previous youth conservation campers cannot attend.  Please contact Kathy Smith, Program Manager/Education Coordinator at ksmith@brswcd.org or at (540) 483-5341 ext. 117 for a 2017 Youth Conservation Camp application along with a list of the 2017 “Camp Highlights”.  The 2017 Youth Conservation Camp applications are to be received by the Blue Ridge District office no later than by Friday, April 14, 2017 at the close of business at 4:30 p.m.

Click on this link to access the 2017 Camper Application_VASWCD and 2017 Camp Highlights

The scholarship winner(s) will be notified by the district as soon as possible.

Submitted applications will be reviewed and screened by the Blue Ridge SWCD Scholarship Committee. Upon notification, the winner(s) will be required to send $75.00 to the Blue Ridge SWCD.  This $75 will be fully refunded upon completion of the camp and a brief report to the directors about their camp adventures.  Travel to and from the camp is the responsibility of the student.

All applications and information contained therein shall remain confidential. All programs and services of the Blue Ridge SWCD and the Virginia Association of Soil & Water conservation District’s Educational Foundation, Inc. are offered on a nondiscriminatory basis, without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, marital status, or disability.

Pictured above, Ciera Mulcahy from the City of Roanoke was the 2015 Youth Conservation Camp scholarship recipient. 2016 Youth Conservation Camp recipients (not pictured) included:  Logan Smith and Jacob Hodges both from Franklin County High School and Josh Pritchett from Magna Vista High School.

 

 

Benjamin Franklin Middle School’s MWEE Gets Face Lift

Benjamin Franklin Middle School’s MWEE “face lift” along Powder Mill Creek is credited to the Pathfinders for Greenways under the direction of Greenways Coordinator Liz Belcher and Mid-Week Crew Director, Bill Gordge.  Since August 2016 the Mid-Week Crew has been diligently working to install best management practices designed to reduce erosion and sediment build-up along Powder Mill Creek located next to Benjamin Franklin Middle School. The strategic design includes a switch back reinforced with crusher run and stone, board walk, wooden bridge access, and relocating certain sections of the newly incorporated circular path.  Additional necessities of this MWEE project include an outdoor classroom complete with instructor podium and observation tables along the section of creek where the approximately 600 6th graders eagerly test the water quality and enjoy the natural beauty of Powder Mill Creek.

To read more about the Benjamin Franklin Middle School’s MWEE Program click on this link:2016-bfms-creek-week-franklin-news-post-review-oct-7th

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Nonpoint Source Success Story: Blackwater River

blackwater-riverAgricultural Best management Practices Improve Aquatic Life in the Blackwater River

 

High sediment loadings led to violations of the general standard for aquatic life use in Franklin County’s Blackwater River.  As a result, the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) added two segments of the Lower Blackwater River to the 2008 Clean Water Act (CWA) section 303(d) list of impaired waters. Landowners installed agricultural best management practices (BMPs); these decreased edge-of-field sediment loading and helped improve water quality.  Because of this improvement, DEQ removed two segments of the Blackwater River from Virginia’s 2014 list of impaired waters for biological impairment.  To read more click on this link 2014-delisted-blackwater

Nonpoint Source Success Story: Big Chestnut Creek

big-chestnut-creekInstalling Residential and Agricultural Best Management Practices Reduces Bacteria in Big Chestnut Creek

High bacteria loadings led to violations of Virginia’s Water Quality Standard (WQS) for designated recreation (swimming) use in Big Chestnut Creek.  As a result, the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) added the creek to its 2004 Clean Water Act (CWA) section 303(d) list of impaired waters.  From 2007 through 2012, stakeholders installed various agricultural and residential practices in the Big Chestnut Creek watershed that decreased nonpoint source runoff.  As a result, Virginia DEQ removed Big Chestnut Creek from its 2014 list of impaired waters based on attainment of the bacteria WQS. To read more click on this link 2014-delisted-bigchestnut

USDA Service Center Welcomes Research Scientists from China

2016 Chinese Engineer Visit at USDA Service CenterOn Tuesday, August 9, 2016 the Blue Ridge Soil & Water Conservation District and Farm Service Agency welcomed three research scientists from China with their area guide Dr.Dave Johnson. The Institute of Hydroecology is under the Ministry of Water Resources (central government), but is also a graduate degree-granting institute of the Chinese Academy of Science. The Institute focuses on both basic and applied research related to ecological and environmental issues resulting from water construction projects with the aim of supporting a sustainable development strategy in China. Since its founding in 1987, the institute has assessed the environmental effects of large hydro-projects such as the Three Gorges Project and the South-to-North Water Diversion project and carried out research on fishery resources in Chinese reservoirs and restoration of the water environment in reservoirs and lakes. Address: 578 Xiongchu Avenue, Wuhan, Hubei, China

  • Photo from left to right: Dr. Dave Johnson (Retired Professor of Chemistry and Environmental Science at Ferrum College), Ms. Xiaojie Pan, Associate Professor and Research Scientist, Applied Ecology Department, Institute of Hydroecology (IHE, MWR & CAS) and she is an environmental biologist with a focus on ecological effects, distribution characteristics, occurrence mechanism, and control measurese for harmful algae,Tony Goff (Farm Service Agency Program Technician), Michael Tabor (Conservation Technician for Blue Ridge SWCD), Mr. Chengyan Wan; Professor, Research Scientist and Director of the Applied Ecology Department, Institute of Hydroecology (IHE, MWR & CAS) and is also Deputy Chief Engineer at IHE,  and Mr. Zhiwei Zheng, Senior Engineer at IHE,  Assistant Professor and Research Scientist, Applied Ecology Department, Institute of Hydroecology (IHE, MWR & CAS).

Goals of visit:

Support and enhance an on-going project in the Three Gorges region, Ecological restoration of Xiaojiang River, which includes:

  1. Evolution of the water environment and ecological mechanisms of algal blooms;
  2.  Construction technology for ecological protection zones;
  3.  Technology for improving riparian habitat;
  4. Pilot demonstration and key technology for fish enhancement and release to prevent and control algal blooms (bio-manipulation);
  5. Key technology research and demonstration for ecological restoration of the Hanfeng Lake wetland.
  • American researchers have always paid attention to the study and application of algal bloom control and ecological restoration, and achieved good results.
  • The objective of this visit is to exchange experiences and achievements on pollution control, eutrophication and algal bloom treatment, riparian zone and river corridor restoration, wetland protection and restoration, monitoring and evaluation of aquatic ecosystems with experts in order to learn additional techniques to support the project and lay the foundation for future research collaborations.
  • To view abstract click on this link:  Journal of Hydroecology abstract-Chinese visitors August 2016